Main Page - Latest News

UK Independent: Whites unlawfully searched to balance racial data.


In an effort to stop Muslim terrorists, without offending any Muslims, huge numbers of white Britons are being harassed by police at random to balance search statistics racially.

Some leftists are now accusing the police of giving the “far right” ammunition by being unlawfully aggressive towards whites. Only 1% of these searches, conducted under the new anti-terrorism powers, yields an arrest.

From UK Independent…

White members of the public are being unlawfully detained by the police in order to give “racial balance” to stop-and-search statistics, a report by the Government’s watchdog on terror laws has found.

Lord Carlile, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, said he knew of cases where suspects were stopped by officers even though there was no evidence or suspicion against them.

He warned that police were wasting money by carrying out “self-evidently unmerited searches” which were an invasion of civil liberties and “almost certainly unlawful”.

Lord Carlile wrote in his report published yesterday: “I have evidence of cases where the person stopped is so obviously far from any known terrorism profile that, realistically, there is not the slightest possibility of him/her being a terrorist, and no other feature to justify the stop. In one situation the basis of the stops was numerical only, which is almost certainly unlawful and in no way an intelligent use of the procedure.”

He added: “I believe it is totally wrong for any person to be stopped in order to produce a racial balance in the Section 44 statistics. There is ample anecdotal evidence this is happening. I can well understand the concerns of the police that they should be free from allegations of prejudice, but it is not a good use of precious resources if they waste them on self-evidently unmerited searches. It is also an invasion of the civil liberties of the person who has been stopped, simply to ‘balance’ the statistics.”

Figures released earlier this year revealed a huge increase in searches using Section 44 powers.

Officers in England and Wales used the powers to search 124,687 people in 2007-08, up from 41,924 in 2006-07. Only 1 per cent of searches led to an arrest. Nearly 90 per cent of the searches were carried out by the Metropolitan Police, which recorded a 266 per cent increase in its use of the power.