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White Apocalypse.


From Occidental Dissent…

Just before he entered Parliament for the first time, future British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli wrote in his diary, “Imagination governs mankind.” What this means is that two of the imagination’s biggest products, culture and the arts, can be two of the most powerful molders of people’s thoughts and actions. Unfortunately this seems to have been willingly forgotten by many on the Right. For at least half a century they have all but handed the cultural sphere over to the Left with open arms. The results of this blunder can been seen that despite the fact that over basically the last 40 years (1968-2008) the Left had only officially 12 years of rule (4 under Carter and 8 under Clinton), America has gone leftward in ways that would have shocked dedicated Socialists a century ago. One can only reason is that this is because the Right has allowed the Left to shape our people’s imagination and emotions without any real fight.

One person who understands this is young Kyle Bristow, the notorious leader of the MSU chapter of YAF. With his debut novel White Apocalypse, Bristow tells a thrilling and intelligent story with epic ramifications. In it a mass grave of prehistoric skeletons is unearthed in Ohio. Of course the Amerindian tribes claim them as their own and demand they be handed over according to Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). However not everyone is certain about their claim. One group is the Institute for American Historical Studies, a think tank dedicated to raising awareness of The Solutrean Hypothesis; the controversy theory that ancient white people migrated to and were living in North America before the Amerindians crossed the Bering Straight and were subsequently wiped out in a horrendous genocide when the Amerindians did. What unfolds during the fight over this finding is an epic of murder, intrigue, terrorism, corruption, and the heroic pursuit of dangerous truths that could rewrite the pages of history.


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