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Is Obama’s 2011 Liberian amnesty responsible for Ebola case in Texas?


In 2011, Obama gave all Liberians de facto amnesty and permission to flood across US borders with impunity. The Obama regime banned US immigration officials from deporting Liberians.

Now someone “who has recently been in Liberia” has Ebola in Texas. The Feds are refusing to say who he is, or whether or not he is an American citizen.

Obama says he will send 3,000 American soldiers to fight Ebola in Africa, even though it puts them in grave risk of contracting the disease.

From Yahoo News…

A man who recently arrived in Texas from Liberia has been confirmed as having the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the U.S.

Authorities with the Centers for Disease Control revealed the finding late Tuesday, two days after the unidentified patient was admitted to a Dallas hospital with suspicious symptoms.

Officials at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas put the man into “strict isolation” and sent a blood specimen to state and federal labs for testing.

Both came back positive for the deadly disease which has killed more than 3,000 people in Africa this year. According to the World Health Organization, there have been more than 6,500 Ebola cases confirmed in Africa, with Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone among the hardest hit.

“He is ill, he is under intensive care, he’s being seen by highly-trained, competent specialists, and the health department is helping us in tracing any family members that might have been exposed,” said Dr. Edward Goodman with Texas Health Dallas.

Authorities declined to name the patient or even say if he is an American.

“The patient was visiting family members and staying with family members who live in this country,” said Dr. Thomas Frieden, CDC director.

Frieden said the man arrived from Liberia on Sept. 20, but didn’t start feeling ill until Sept. 24. He sought medical treatment at Texas Health Dallas on Friday, Sept. 26 before being sent home. He was then admitted to the hospital on Sunday the 28th.

“The initial symptoms of Ebola are often non-specific … they are symptoms that may be associated with many other conditions,” Frieden said. “That’s why we have encouraged all emergency department physicians to take a history of travel within the last 21 days.”