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UN: 122 nation gun ban, including the USA, effective this Christmas


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The UN Arms Trade Treaty [ATT], signed by the Obama regime, is set to go into effect this Christmas. At least that is what the United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs [UNODA] is saying.

According to the UNODA website, the Obama regime signed the treaty on September, 25 2013. UNODA says the treaty will “go into force” on December 24th, 2014 in 122 nations. However, UNODA does admit that in 68 of those nations, no legislative body has actually approved the treaties.

The UN ATT is essentially a global ban on private gun ownership. Each signatory agrees to relinquish national sovereignty and place the UN in charge of enacting gun laws. Each signatory also agrees to enforce whatever gun laws the UN so desires.

In the past 100 years, governments have killed more people than any other cause. The UN wants to make sure that trend continues.

Obama violated the US Constitution and his oath of office by agreeing to the “treaty.”

For a full text of the ATT, click here.

From NewAmerican…

On its official website, the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (yes, that’s really a thing and yes, it is housed right here in the United States) announced that the UN’s Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) “will enter into force on 24 December 2014.”

Merry Christmas!

It is ironical that on the day before the world’s 2.18 billion Christians commemorate the coming of Jesus Christ to the Earth, the United Nations will officially put into motion a plan to deny them of a right given to them by the very God whose birth they celebrate.

 For those unfamiliar with the text of the UN’s Arms Trade Treaty, here’s a brief sketch of the most noxious provisions:

• Article 2 of the treaty defines the scope of the treaty’s prohibitions. The right to own, buy, sell, trade, or transfer all means of armed resistance, including handguns, is denied to civilians by this section of the Arms Trade Treaty.

• Article 3 places the “ammunition/munitions fired, launched or delivered by the conventional arms covered under Article 2” within the scope of the treaty’s prohibitions, as well.

• Article 4 rounds out the regulations, also placing all “parts and components” of weapons within the scheme.

• Perhaps the most immediate threat to the rights of gun owners in the Arms Trade Treaty is found in Article 5. Under the title of “General Implementation,” Article 5 mandates that all countries participating in the treaty “shall establish and maintain a national control system, including a national control list.” This list should “apply the provisions of this Treaty to the broadest range of conventional arms.”

• Article 12 adds to the record-keeping requirement, mandating that the list include “the quantity, value, model/type, authorized international transfers of conventional arms,” as well as the identity of the “end users” of these items.

• Finally, the agreement demands that national governments take “appropriate measures” to enforce the terms of the treaty, including civilian disarmament. If these countries can’t get this done on their own, however, Article 16 provides for UN assistance, specifically including help with the enforcement of “stockpile management, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programmes.” In fact, a “voluntary trust fund” will be established to assist those countries that need help from UN peacekeepers or other regional forces to disarm their citizens.