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Tribute to Gordon L. Baum

baum_cover2by Hunter Wallace

As many of you are aware by now, my father-in-law, Gordon Lee Baum, Esq., a founder and the present CEO of the Council of Conservative Citizens, passed away last Thursday after a long battle with cancer. He was 74 years old.

I’ve been in St. Louis since Friday afternoon. Gordon’s funeral, which was attended by a number of CofCC members as well as by many local people whose lives he had touched over the years, was Sunday. We buried him yesterday. Renee and I found the photo above while looking through some of his old boxes here. It struck me as the image that best captured who he was and his legacy to our generation.

Gordon was not someone who admitted defeat, who gave up, and that is putting it mildly. Since he was 16-years-old, he spent his entire adult life completely devoted to the cause of our people – literally days before his death, while he recovered from pneumonia, he was telling us to call various CofCC members. Even then, his mind was still focused on the cause. In this way, he reminded me of one of my heroes, the South Carolina fire eater Robert Barnwell Rhett, who once said, “I will keep up the fire, if like a lost hunter in a prairie, I have to kindle it alone, with my gun flint, and watch by the blaze, rifle in hand to keep off the wolves.”

That was my father-in-law in his time: when the Civil Rights of Act of 1964 was passed, when the Citizens’ Councils movement collapsed, when George Wallace, Strom Thurmond, and all the rest repudiated segregation and proclaimed their newfound faith in “racial equality,” when others quit, Gordon Lee Baum stood firm. As the world entered the present Dark Age, Gordon was there to keep up the fire of resistance. Together with other veterans of the Citizens’ Councils, he rebuilt the defunct organization as the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) in the 1980s, which has remained down to the present day an island of stability in the pro-White movement in the United States.

Like many alienated young people, that’s what first caught my eye about the CofCC. By then, it was an established institution with an unmatched record of stability, an organization with deep roots in the old resistance to the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. The CofCC was a natural home for White people with a populist conservative temperament who wanted to work with others, without apology or dog whistles, to preserve and restore traditional Southern values. At the 2010 CofCC National Conference, Gordon gave me a hard sales pitch and I signed up then and there. That was no small thing. It later had a decisive impact on my life.

Every night without fail right down until the end, Gordon sat down in this chair to watch and absorb the local and national evening news. That will be one of my lasting memories of him. He wouldn’t have understood the reference, but he was, so to speak, a “Watcher on the Wall.” Near the end of his life, he watched the entire Ferguson saga unfold. Decades ago, he was watching the St. Louis metro area transform into “Ferguson,” and was dumbstruck that White people passively let it happen.

I stayed up with him many nights here talking about every subject imaginable with the exception of sports: some of his favorite topics were German and European history, the rise and fall of St. Louis, the history of the pro-White movement, his family and ancestors, the Lutheran Church and the existence of racial differences. It’s a shame that he never got around to writing a book about his life’s work. It would have been a good one.

I will also remember Gordon for his good natured sense of humor. Before we were so well acquainted, his nickname for me, apparently, was “Napoleon,” a reference to all the various pseudonyms that I have used in the past, including this one. He was perplexed and amused that people could believe so strongly in the welfare of their people, but were so afraid to be associated with their own beliefs.

Men used to be proud of their names and even prouder of their deeds. They were expected to defend their folk. Why are men in America today so afraid to stand up for what they believe in? Do they really care so much about what liberals think? He didn’t. One of his proudest memories was the CofCC’s role in defending the Confederate Battle Flag in Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina.

In hindsight, Gordon’s influence was one of the reasons why I abandoned anonymity and chose to take a more pro-active stand. Whereas previously I had just been a blogger, he convinced me of the importance of organizing our people. Among other things, I learned from him not to fight too much with other people, to stay level headed and good humored in these trying times, and not to get carried away with ideology, abstractions, or to expect too much from ordinary people in this fallen world.

Gordon Lee Baum fought to the end of his life to secure the future existence of his people. One day I will be able to tell my son, which is his grandson, that his grandfather, unlike so many other people, chose to confront this evil for the sake of his future. That’s the example that I want to live up to.

Please donate to the CofCC in honor of Gordon Baum